Animal Welfare and Environmental Conservation2019-02-22T04:36:51+10:00

ANIMAL WELFARE AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONSERVATION

Working to meet the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals 14 and 15

The world’s oceans – their temperature, chemistry, currents and life – drive global systems that make the Earth habitable for humankind. Our rainwater, drinking water, weather, climate, coastlines, much of our food, and even the oxygen in the air we breathe, are all ultimately provided and regulated by the sea.

Careful management of this essential global resource is a key feature of a sustainable future. However, at the current time, there is a continuous deterioration of coastal waters owing to pollution and ocean acidification is having an adversarial effect on the functioning of ecosystems and biodiversity.

Oceans contain nearly 200,000 identified species, but actual numbers may lie in the millions.

Oceans absorb about 30 percent of carbon dioxide produced by humans, buffering the impacts of global warming.

The Wildlife Works Kasigau Corridor project protects 500,000 acres of dryland forest in southeastern Kenya that form a crucial corridor between two National Parks, Tsavo East and Tsavo West. The Kasigua Corridor is home to many endangered and poached animals, like the African elephant, lion, cheetah, wild dogs, and Grevy’s zebra.

Forests cover 30.7 percent of the Earth’s surface and, in addition to providing food security and shelter, they are key to combating climate change, protecting biodiversity and the homes of the indigenous population. By protecting forests, we will also be able to strengthen natural resource management and increase land productivity.

At the current time, thirteen million hectares of forests are being lost every year while the persistent degradation of drylands has led to the desertification of 3.6 billion hectares. Even though up to 15% of land is currently under protection, biodiversity is still at risk. Deforestation and desertification – caused by human activities and climate change – pose major challenges to sustainable development.

Forests are home to more than 80 percent of all terrestrial species of animals, plants and insects.

Illicit poaching and trafficking of wildlife continues to thwart conservation efforts, with nearly 7,000 species of animals and plants reported in illegal trade involving 120 countries.

Of the 8,300 animal breeds known, 8 percent are extinct and 22 percent are at risk of extinction.

Of the over 80,000 tree species, less than 1 percent have been studied for potential use.

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